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They break, you know

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They Break, You Know

By Liz Curtis Faria

 

 

Editor’s note- There is no solution to child abuse, or any of its consequences, that work as well as prevention. But in practice, that gets forgotten and drowned out. Laws are passed to tinker with CPS and to better monitor kids in foster care. But the damage caused by abuse, and the further damage of drifting through foster care are so easy to overlook. Thank you so much, Liz, for forcing us to look at them, and to keep them in mind when we think through these issues.

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It was something about the phrasing that got to me. Something about the cadence of his words, the staccato of his speech.

 

“Nobody loves me. Not even my mother who gave birth to me.”

 

It is an odd turn of phrase, isn’t it?

 

Not even my mother who gave birth to me.

 

He was buckled into the backseat of my Toyota, still too little to sit up front. At 7 he had already moved more times than the total number of years he had been on the earth. And this time, like the times before it, he moved with his belongings in a trash bag. A suitcase, at least, would have added a small degree of dignity to the whole affair — to being “placed” in another and another and yet another foster home before reaching the third grade. Trash bags break, you know. Trash bags can’t possibly support the contents of any life, and certainly not a life as fragile as this.

 

They break from the strain, eventually.

 

This move was harder for Stephen than most. It was a home he thought he would stay in, at least for a while. He had felt affection there. When I went to pick him up, after his foster mother gave notice that he could no longer stay, he came easily with me; head down, no reaction on the surface of it. It was only when he got into my car that he began to sob the kind of aching sound that leaves you limp in its wake.

 

He could barely get out the words. Nobody loves me. Not even my mother who gave birth to me.

 

Months later, in a repeat scene (another foster mother, another removal), he would put up a fight. He would run around the living room, ducking behind furniture, refusing to leave. But on this night he had no fight in him.

 

That was Stephen at 7.

 

Nine-year old Stephen grips his report card in sweaty hands. We’re headed to an adoption event, where we will meet families who want to adopt an older child; families who do not automatically rule out a boy like Stephen with all of his long “history.” And he wants to impress them, these strangers. He wants to win them over, and so he brings his good report card along as tangible proof that he is a child worth loving.

 

A child should never have to prove they are worth loving.

 

Twelve-year old Stephen tells me that I’m his best friend. I’m his social worker, and he should have a real best friend, but I don’t say this to him. We’re at a taping for Wednesday’s Child, the news spot featuring children who are up for adoption. Stephen is engaging on camera. Maybe somebody will pick him this time. Maybe he is offering just enough evidence, at 12, that he’s a boy worth loving. And he is lovable, truly. But it is not enough. A family never comes.

 

Years later, long after I’ve left the agency, I get an email from my old boss asking how I’m doing, and ending with a short P.S. “Stephen is in DYS lockup after running away from his foster home. You need to adopt him.” My stomach drops. I’ve had this thought many times. I should adopt him myself. But I don’t.

 

I heard about his murder from a friend who had seen it in the news. Shot outside a party over some foolish dispute. Dead at 18, dead just as he became a man. Not my Stephen, I prayed. When I realized that it was really him — that it could be no other — I sobbed, gripped by the kind of anguish that leaves you limp in its wake.

 

The newspapers ran very little about the murder, as if it were an afterthought. Barely worth a mention, really. Anonymous strangers posted nasty comments online: “Just another gangbanger,” they said.

 

You don’t even know him. You don’t know the first thing about this boy. You don’t know that as a child he would trace letters into my back with his finger to pass time at the doctor’s office, asking me to guess what phrase he was spelling out. “I ♥ U” he traced between my shoulders, the last time we played this game.

 

Stephen had been wrong, that night in my Toyota. His mother did love him, in her way. She was there, at the funeral. She greeted me kindly. I think she knew I loved Stephen as I knew she did. We both failed him in the end, and that joined us I suppose. Neither of us could give him a family.

 

There were no photos from Stephen’s childhood at the funeral home. No images of the green-eyed boy with the sweet smile to remind us of what had been lost. There were no pictures of Stephen with his brothers, and so I printed up snapshots of the four boys together, taken on a supervised visit, and brought them to the funeral to give to the family. It was something I could do, against the larger backdrop of nothing I could do.

 

There were very few social workers at the funeral, and none of Stephen’s many foster mothers. Were they even told he was dead? Stephen spent more of his life being raised in the system than out of it. If you claim legal responsibility for a child, you best show up at his funeral. You should show up when he dies. He was yours, in a way, wasn’t he? You owe it to him. And if he did not belong to you, then who did he ever belong to?

His mother was there, at least. His mother who gave birth to him. I hear the echo of his voice from those many years ago.

 

Somebody does love you, Stephen. I want to tell him. But it’s too late.

 

Stephen was the one, for me. The one who embodied all the failures of a system so broken that to heal it would take far more than the casts that heal the literal broken bones of the children growing up within it.

 

They break, you know. These kids we leave behind. Eventually they break.

Click Here to Prevent Child Abuse

No More Broken Children. No More Murdered Children

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Bio

Liz Curtis Faria spent much of the past decade as a social worker and photographer. Now a full-time mom and blogger, Liz writes about the joy and ridiculousness that is motherhood at A Mothership Down.

*Stephen is a fictional name for a real boy the world lost.

This post originally appeared on BLUNTmoms and Scary Mommy.

November is National Adoption Month. For information on adoption from the foster care system, visit the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption.

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