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Policing The Police

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Dottie Davis, a former deputy police chief of Fort Wayne, Ind., said she was battered by her domestic partner, also an officer. Read the story in the New York Times. See link below.

Dottie Davis, a former deputy police chief of Fort Wayne, Ind., said she was battered by her domestic partner, also an officer. Read the story in the New York Times. See link below.

Real quotes from real survivors

“… In 10 years I called twice. My first call I had a bloodied lip and their response was if he wasn’t there then they could do nothing. My second call was when he yanked me down by my hair with my newborn daughter in my arms. I was told since I had no visible injuries they couldn’t make him leave.”

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“I called 911. One of the two police officers responding stated ‘It’s his house … he can punch a hole in the door if he wants to,’” as well as “They didn’t think it was rape, because he didn’t hold me down or anything.

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“The police didn’t enforce my protective order. [They] told me they had to witness my ex in the act of violating it…”

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“You need to stop provoking him.”

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“I was also asked to go on a date by one of the officers involved at the time.”

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These are real quotes from real survivors of intimate partner violence.

Unfortunately, these are responses from law enforcement officers when survivors reached out for help. We’re Christine Murray and Allison Crowe, co-founders of  See the Triumph – a research–based, public awareness social media project.

We’ve heard stories from over 200 participants.

One of our goals is to eradicate the stigma that still surrounds intimate partner violence – this includes educating and raising awareness about some of the injustices survivors face everywhere. The last thing that a survivor needs after calling 9-1-1 for help is to be met with these types of responses.

 

Recently, the New York Times highlighted some of the problems with law enforcement and IPV.

Click here to read the story, if you haven’t already.

 

We share many of the concerns expressed in the article, in fact, you can visit our blog page to read more, including Christine’s blog “Laws that Deny and Dismiss” on this very topic.

 

The bottom line is – when minimal or no consequences for IPV are in place, a powerful, yet harmful message is sent that this form of violence is okay to engage in, and that is not like other crimes.

  • We ask you now, are there laws like this in your area? If you don’t know, look up federal and state-specific statutes through WomensLaw.org.

  • How can we change the culture, or system, so that IPV is taken seriously?

  • What sort of education and training might law enforcement officers, in particular, benefit from to help understand IPV and deal with it appropriately?

  • What is one small step you can take in the right direction to see that this happens in your community?


Christine and Allison
Co-Founders,

 

 

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